Category: Google

Microsoft Nags Google’s “Chrome Everywhere” Video

By | May 16, 2013 | 5 Comments

Microsoft Nags Google's "Chrome Everywhere" VideoAnd the drama continues…

Back in March, Google has published a “Chrome Everywhere” video, which, as you might have guessed from the title, celebrates the availability of Google’s Chrome web browser on a pretty much every platform and form factor.

Well, it looks like Microsoft has a different idea and this is what it looks like:
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Google Thanks Web Developers (Video)

By | May 16, 2013 | 0 Comments

Earlier this month, Microsoft has published a video to thank developers for their contributions all over the world. Now, it looks like Google too has decided to thank them with (in my opinion) a much better version.

JPEG Vs. Google’s WebP

By | May 15, 2013 | 9 Comments

JPEG Vs. Google’s WebP

And one more thing…

How else can Google demonstrate its superiority? Display how WebP compares to JPEG or PNG, obviously. Without sacrificing the quality, WebP is able to achieve dramatic reduction in size by up to 34% when compared to JPEG and up to 26% when compared to PNG.
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Google’s VP9 Vs. H.264

By | May 15, 2013 | 4 Comments

Google’s VP9 Vs. H.264

Shows an amazing difference in bandwidth and file size.

As the I/O event continues, Google has just compared its VP9 video compression standard to H.264 and as you can see in the slide above, VP9 offered a decrease in size of 63% when compared to H.264, at least in one particular video.
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Google: There Are Now 750 Million Chrome Users

By | May 15, 2013 | 7 Comments

Google: There Are Now 750 Million Chrome Users

In today’s Google’s I/O event, the search giant has revealed that their user base has increased to over 750 million users, up from 450 million since last year.

The keynote itself is not yet over, head over to the following page for a live stream URL.

Live Stream: Google I/O Keynote

By | May 15, 2013 | 1 Comment

Microsoft Trademarks “Blink”

By | April 16, 2013 | 8 Comments

Google takes notice.

As you might know, Google has recently announced its new rendering engine called Blink, which made us wonder whether or not Microsoft will soon be involved. Why? If you are a Windows Phone user, then there is a high probability that you are already using a photography app by Microsoft Research (first demonstrated in September 2012), which too is called “Blink”.
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Google’s Blink Q&A (Video)

By | April 9, 2013 | 0 Comments

Google’s Blink Q&A (Video)Blink is coming to Google Chrome in roughly 10 weeks.

After announcing its departure from WebKit, Google held a Q&A session, which can be seen in the video below.

If you don’t feel like watching all of it, here is a list of questions as well as a timeframe so you can jump to the segment that interests you:
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Opera Changes Its Mind, Will Use Blink Instead Of WebKit

By | April 4, 2013 | 38 Comments

Opera Changes Its Mind, Will Use Blink Instead Of WebKitTune in tomorrow when Opera switches to Trident.

It looks like Apple is about to lose a yet another contributor, at least in the long term. After Google’s announcement that they will be moving away from WebKit, Opera Software announced that they too will contribute and use Blink to power their web browsers.
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Google Plans To Ditch WebKit, Announces Blink

By | April 4, 2013 | 9 Comments

Google Plans To Ditch WebKit, Announces BlinkNo more vendor prefixes.

Now here is something that you won’t see very often. Yesterday, Google has announced its plans to “ditch” WebKit and develop their own rendering engine called Blink. Now, before developers get a heart attack, it should be noted that Blink (when it comes to standards) is pretty much a rebranded version of WebKit, at least for now.

So why do it at all? As explained by Adam Barth, the software engineer at Google, it’s all about reducing the complexity and simplifying your overall code base. In fact, it’s estimated that right off the bat they will be able to remove over 7,000 files with a total of 4.5 million lines in code, which says a lot.

Where all these complexities come from? According to Adam, “Chromium uses a different multi-process architecture than other WebKit-based browsers, and supporting multiple architectures over the years has led to increasing complexity for both the WebKit and Chromium projects.”
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